Here’s a POV of All the Gladiator Concepts Coming to Easter Jeep Safari

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Jeep Wayout

Wayout

The Wayout Concept is the first of the six vehicles headed to Moab that was really designed with an out-of-the-box approach. The Flatbill, Gravity and Scrambler are all concepts that would be easily created by an average Gladiator owner, but the Wayout is for the more extreme Jeeper. More specifically, this concept truck was designed for someone who wants to get so deep into the woods that once there, they need to wait for morning.

This Gladiator build began with the basics, such as a two-inch lift kit, 17-inch steel wheels wrapped 37-inch mud-terrain tires, a 12,000-lb. Warn winch, a cold air intake snorkel kit and a unique interior layout with custom leather and travel stamps scattered through the cabin. However, this Jeep has two very unique upgrades in the form of a bed rack that incorporates a pop-up sleeping area and a gigantic fold-out canopy that attaches to the side of the bed rack.

Jeep Wayout

As you can see in the video below, the Wayout goes from off-road pickup to camping site in less than a minute, with the canopy swinging out and the sleeping area roof cranking into the upright position in a hurry. The Jeep team then added some chairs, a faux fire pits and some peaceful wilderness sounds to creating the camping feel for the small crowd in attendance.

Jeep Wayout

If you are into hunting, fishing or anything else that would take you deep into the wilderness for days at a time, the Jeep Wayout shows how nicely the new pickup can be built into a rolling camping site.

J6

While the new Gladiator has gotten rave reviews, there are still plenty of people calling for a two-door version and the J6 Concept is the small pickup that many people want.

Jeep J6

This truck looks absolutely incredible front to back, inside and out, but the odds of this truck coming to production right away aren’t very good.

Jeep J6

That is because this isn’t actually a Gladiator. The J6 began its life as a JL Wrangler Unlimited. The SUV body was removed and shortened to create the short, two-door cab design and while the bed is based on the unit from the new Gladiator, this bed is a foot longer than the production truck.

Jeep J6

The overall length of the J6 Concept is 201 inches and, like the Wrangler Unlimited, the wheelbase is 118.4 inches. For comparison, the new Gladiator is 218-inches long, with a wheelbase of 137.3 inches, so the J6 is a bit shorter overall, but it is much shorter between the wheels and that makes for a very cool little pickup.

Jeep J6

This truck has an assortment of other upgrades from Mopar, Jeep Performance Parts and some concept items, but the real focus here is the two-door design and I absolutely love it.

Jeep J6

I had a chance to sit in this truck and even with the shortened cab, there is plenty of space for a tall driver and passenger in addition to extra cargo space.

Jeep J6

I want very badly to see Jeep bring the J6 to production, as it is a great-looking midsized truck that is sure to appeal to the same group of people who buy the two-door Wrangler.

M-715 Five-Quarter

The only truck headed to Moab this year that isn’t based on the new Gladiator is technically based on the original Gladiator. Jeep offered the Wagoneer-based Gladiator from 1962 through 1971 and in the late-1960s, the brand rolled out the M-715 military truck. Unlike many purpose-built military machines, the M-715 was based on the commercial Gladiator pickup and it was used for years by the military of several different countries.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

The Jeep team found this 1968 M-715 online and purchased it to create the ultimate military pickup-turned-off-road machine. The result is what I think might be the coolest classic military Jeep that I have seen, with this truck being modified to perfection inside, outside, under the truck and under the hood to create the Five-Quarter.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

Up front, this glorious machine has a custom carbon fiber hood that flips forward to reveal the supercharged Hemi. The front end design has been preserved, but the original headlight spots are now blinding off-road lights, the turn signals are now air inlets and the actual headlights are mounted in the sheet metal, just above the factory bumper from a new Gladiator.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

Along the sides, the factory wheel opening flares have been extended and accentuated. When coupled with the huge custom suspension system, there is plenty of room for the 20-inch beadlock wheels wrapped in 40-inch Maxxis tires.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

The roof has been replaced with a canvas convertible top and the windshield has been cut down by three-and-a-half inches.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

Out back, the stock steel bed has been replaced with a lightweight aluminum cargo box that utilizes a unique open-air design. The sides, floor and tailgate of the bed are all open, allowing water, sand and other dirt to make its way back to Earth while still keeping large contents in place.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

On the inside, the Five-Quarter has JL seats with custom leather and no headrests, an aluminum dash layout with custom gauges and a shift console that is made from the case of a classic 8-71 supercharger.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

Finally, in addition to the Dynatrac Pro-rock 60 front axle, the Dynatrac Pro-rock 80 rear axle and a full custom coilover suspension system, this M-715 features the 6.2-liter supercharged Hemi known as the Hellcat.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

This engine sends 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque to all four wheels with help from a built Chrysler 727 transmission and a heavy duty transfer case.

Jeep M-715 Five-Quarter

This classic Jeep pickup should be an absolute beast on any sort of loose footing and I hope with all of my might that there will be high speed off-roading footage of the Five-Quarter from next week’s Easter Jeep Safari. In the meantime, check out the video below of the M-715 idling and revving, as well as a quick walk-around video.

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A lifetime automotive expert, diehard Dodge fan, and respected auto journalist for over 10 years, Patrick Rall is highly experienced in the automotive world. He has clocked in time as an auto mechanic, longtime drag racer and now auto journalist who contributes to nearly a dozen popular websites dedicated to fellow enthusiasts.

“Before I was old enough to walk, my dad was taking me to various types of racing events, from local drag racing to the Daytona 500,” says Rall. “He owned a repair shop and had a variety of performance cars when I was young, but by the time I was 16, he was ready to build me my first drag car: a 1983 Dodge Mirada that ran low 12s. I spent 10 years traveling around the country, racing with my dad by my side. While we live in different areas of the country, my dad still drag races at 80 years old in the car that he built when I was 16. Meanwhile, I race other vehicles, including my 2017 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat and my 1972 Dodge Demon 340.

“Although I went to college for accounting, my time in my dad’s shop growing up allowed me the knowledge to spend time working as a mechanic before getting my accounting degree, at which point I worked in the office of a dealership group,” adds Rall. “While I was working in the accounting world, I continued racing and taking pictures of cars at the track. Over time, I began showing off those pictures online and that led to my writing.

“Ten years ago, I left the accounting world to become a full-time automotive writer and I am living proof that if you love what you do, you will never ‘work’ a day in your life. I love covering the automotive industry and everything involved with the job. I was fortunate to turn my love of the automotive world into a hobby that led to an exciting career, with my past of working as a mechanic and as an accountant in the automotive world provides me with a unique perspective of the industry.

“My experience drag racing for more than 20 years coupled with a newfound interest in road racing over the past decade allows me to push performance cars to their limit, while my role as a horse stable manager gives me vast experience towing and hauling with all of the newest trucks on the market today.

“Being based on Detroit, I never miss the North American International Auto Show, the Woodward Dream Cruise and Roadkill Nights, along with spending plenty of time raising hell on Detroit’s Woodward Avenue with the best muscle car crowd in the world.”

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