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LED light bar kits with SPOD

 
Old 05-20-2019, 04:25 AM
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Default LED light bar kits with SPOD

I removed my old KC Hilights from my 2010 JK yesterday. I would like to add a light bar kit like this one: Rugged Ridge 11232.57 Fast Track Kit (3 Bars, 8 Rounds; 07-18 JK) https://ruggedridge.com/fasttrack-ki...-11232-57.html

Here are my issues. The KC lights came with relay switches in the harness and I connected them all directly to the battery. So I had lots of wires tucked in under the hood all around the battery. Years later I installed an SPOD in hopes to eliminate all the extra wires around my battery and to have a nice clean switch panel in the Jeep. The SPOD replaced the switches but not the rest of the wires. Or at least, I do not know how to remove the rest of the wires as they carried the power from the battery to the lights.

So, I am now searching for LED lights that I can connect to the SPOD and not have to have the extra relay switch in the harness. And, not have to run any wires directly to the battery. The problem for me is, I am not too bright. I think the SPOD does not deliver the power to illuminate the lights but rather the power to trigger the relay that then delivers the power from the battery to the lights. If so, then why are there relays in the SPOD?

Can anyone shine some light on this matter for me? I feel like there is simple answer and I am just not getting it.

Thanks,
John
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Old 05-20-2019, 07:24 AM
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Just wire directly from the SPod to the lights, remove any other fuse or relay.
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Old 05-20-2019, 07:39 AM
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What carty said, The SPOD is the relay and fuse system. Just wire everything directly to it. The only thing that should be connected to the battery is the Spod and from the Spod to the light there should only be wire.
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Old 05-20-2019, 08:17 AM
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Exactly as stated above. The SPOD has the switches and relays. You wire the power and ground from the lights directly to the terminals on the SPOD, without all the other harness stuff the lights come with. Put that in a box in your shop for spare parts. I pulled relays and fuses and put them in a bag in the Jeep for spare trail parts in case someone else might need them. Anything you have spare parts for won't break, so I'm good.
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Old 05-20-2019, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by jordy View Post
Anything you have spare parts for won't break, so I'm good.
I think this is the truest statement i have ever seen
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Old 05-20-2019, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by jordy View Post
You wire the power and ground from the lights directly to the terminals on the SPOD, without all the other harness stuff the lights come with.
John, just to boil it down to real peanut butter and jelly terms, and expand on what Jordy says here, all you need running from the lights is simple 2 wires. If there is anything else in the wiring loom (relay or in-line fuse for example), just take some snips and cut it off so you're left with simple 2 wires. Now, you may need to extend those wires, but just hook them to the the two terminals for the desired fuse/switch on the sPOD and you're set.
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Old 05-21-2019, 04:36 PM
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Thanks guys. Until this post, I did not realize I could just cut out the rest of the wire harness. Also, for some reason I was thinking it was a larger gauge to run the juice to the lights then what it is. I tried this with my old lights. everything worked out so well that I remounted them and called it a day. So this post saved my $1500.00, well, for now anyways.
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Old 05-22-2019, 05:33 AM
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Originally Posted by prelucir View Post
Thanks guys. Until this post, I did not realize I could just cut out the rest of the wire harness. Also, for some reason I was thinking it was a larger gauge to run the juice to the lights then what it is. I tried this with my old lights. everything worked out so well that I remounted them and called it a day. So this post saved my $1500.00, well, for now anyways.
It is possible to exceed the maximum current rating of the sPOD, which is 50 amps (at least mine is). They offer an 80 amp wiring harness if that's a concern. It replaces the wiring harness from the battery to the sPOD under the hood.

https://www.4x4spod.com/hi_amp_circuit_breaker_spod

EDIT: You'll want that if you add the amps drawn by everything connected directly to the sPOD (not through relays as you were before--then just use the relay coil current, which is generally negligible) and it exceeds 45 amps (leaving a 10 percent reserve). Remember: Electrical fires often start after a period of time (even hours) for the wiring to get hot, melt the insulation, and then short to ground, causing sparking, excessive current draw, and fire. To determine the current draw of lights, divide the power (wattage) of the bulbs by 12. That "12" actually has some built-in safety factor since it doesn't take into account actual battery/alternator voltage, nor voltage drop across the wiring.

Last edited by Mark Doiron; 05-22-2019 at 05:40 AM.
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