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TeraFlex Falcon Shocks and Nexus Steering Stabilizer

 
Old 02-06-2017, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by karls10jk View Post
A couple things-

It's peculiar that they specify 25psi for tire pressure. That by itself will soften the ride and kinda withdraws TF from the overland/ DD crowd. I drive mine on the highway everyday, it needs more than 25psi to avoid tearing up the tires. Did you drop your pressure to get the full benefit of the ride quality?

I see they specify an oil for the shocks, is there a place to add oil on them?

I'm guessing the rears wouldn't work nicely with lower shock relocation/ skid plates.....that would be unfortunate because they look to have potential but those of us who have committed to cutting the stock mounts may be out of luck.


Keep us posted long term. Lots of these new products are great when they come out and then the 'new' wears off and they aren't what they were. I hope these are different.
I agree with the tire pressure comment, I wonder of they're recommending 25 PSI for offroading only? I'll have to look into it... I agree with you about tearing up tires with lower pressures. I usually run around 12-18 PSI depending on what I'm doing when offroad, 25 seems high for rocks. I'm very much in the overlanding/DD crowd. I did run 15/16 PSI in Moab yesterday out of habit and it seemed OK, but I haven't tried 25 PSI offroad.

I don't know that you can add oil, but they specify Redline synthetic shock oil (I said Lucas Oil synthetic shock oil in my video, but they changed to Redline once production started, because it works better in cold temps). I think they mention the type of oil they used so you know what's in them and whats needed if they're ever rebuilt.

It's hard for me to say about the rear-lower shock mounts... if you can cut them to raise them, I guess you could always weld the right length mounts back on, using aftermarket & beefier mounts?

From what I've seen, I think these are a long term winner... they totally changed how my JKU drives and it's all for the better. The change was massive, not just a slight difference.


Originally Posted by numbah1 View Post
I've been pretty giddy about these things; especially after watching the Teraflex Falcon videos time and time again. The cool part is that I'm able to upgrade these to the 3.3's later on (if I'm so inclined).

For the time being, I'm running the Bilstein 5160's and have been for the past 3 years. It's been a great shock and coming from a cheap Rusty's brand monotube, it was a night and day difference. I'm hoping that I'll be able to find that same feeling once I put these on. Like I said... I can't wait!
Yeah, you were wise! I should have got the 3.1's! I'd love to hear how they compare to the Bilstein 5160's!
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Old 02-07-2017, 04:35 AM
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Originally Posted by bonanza View Post
but that rear design is the same poor design of Rancho's shocks. Meaning, keeping the shock body down and exposed is a huge no-no in my book.
I always wondered why some shocks were mounted this way, the body side down always seemed upside down from what I was used to seeing. Is there any advantage associated with putting them in that orientation?
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Old 02-07-2017, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Rednroll View Post
I always wondered why some shocks were mounted this way, the body side down always seemed upside down from what I was used to seeing. Is there any advantage associated with putting them in that orientation?

All covered in post #4....

https://www.jk-forum.com/forums/modi...7/#post4276120
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Old 02-07-2017, 09:43 AM
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I like the idea of the front shock. A lot! They put the reservoir right where I almost put mine because piggy backed my front reservoir always rubbed the tire no matter how I turned it.

The back reservoir, well I'm just not a fan. There reasoning is clear but they should go back to the drawing board and find another way. Part of me believes they wanted the reservoir where it could be seen for the ever growing mall crawler crowd. The rear reservoir is hanging down like a boat anchor even in their video showing how tough it is it's still a liability to get hung up on even if it can handle abuse. We go to great lengths to lift our jeeps and tummy tuck and raise control arm and shock mounts.

This is a huge step backwards except for mall crawlers who want to be showing their reservoirs...

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Old 02-07-2017, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Biginboca View Post
I like the idea of the front shock. A lot! They put the reservoir right where I almost put mine because piggy backed my front reservoir always rubbed the tire no matter how I turned it.

The back reservoir, well I'm just not a fan. There reasoning is clear but they should go back to the drawing board and find another way. Part of me believes they wanted the reservoir where it could be seen for the ever growing mall crawler crowd. The rear reservoir is hanging down like a boat anchor even in their video showing how tough it is it's still a liability to get hung up on even if it can handle abuse. We go to great lengths to lift our jeeps and tummy tuck and raise control arm and shock mounts.

This is a huge step backwards except for mall crawlers who want to be showing their reservoirs...

There's always the option of ordering the Falcon 2.1 Monoshock like I am running. That way there is no Reservoir that you have to deal with and you still get the strength and most of the performance benefits.

Last edited by [email protected]; 02-07-2017 at 10:06 AM.
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Old 02-07-2017, 10:59 AM
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Most people spin that shock around in the rear to protect that knob.
If you are crunching the shock body, move the shock up, there are a lot of option (like the Rockstars) that get the shock body up and out of the way.


Originally Posted by bonanza View Post
Big fan of Teraflex products. Those front shocks looks fantastic, but that rear design is the same poor design of Rancho's shocks. Meaning, keeping the shock body down and exposed is a huge no-no in my book. I crunched a 9000xl fairly quickly-- that cheap plastic knob, and then on another trip, the shock body itself. That location is simply too vulnerable. I'm especially interested to see how many people running the reservoirs back there suffer the same fate.

I'd like to hear a justification why it was designed that way.

edit-- I watched the video response posted below. Very impressive. I was so annoyed at the poor design of Rancho that I assumed TF would suffer the same fate. I admit I'm likely wrong. The fact that they strengthened the lower portion of the shock is very impressive. I'm not 100% convinced that it's the best design, but I do like that this specific issue is addressed. A Rooster tail guard, or even a plastic sleeve could rectify the danger of rock chips on the shaft.Attachment 666123
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Old 02-07-2017, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by karls10jk View Post
A couple things-

It's peculiar that they specify 25psi for tire pressure. That by itself will soften the ride and kinda withdraws TF from the overland/ DD crowd. I drive mine on the highway everyday, it needs more than 25psi to avoid tearing up the tires. Did you drop your pressure to get the full benefit of the ride quality?
I talked to Joe at Teraflex today about the tire pressure question, his answer was very informative and I hope I can pass the information on so that it makes sense.

The 25 psi recommendation is simply there to let you know what tire pressure these shocks had been tuned at. They aren't recommending that your run 25 psi ONLY, on the road or off road. It is simply a Baseline so you have a number to compare to, when the shocks were tuned by the manufacturer.

Talking to Joe, the idea of mentioning the tire pressure was debated by more than a couple people. It sounds like they realized there would be some confusion with this mention, in my opinion I'm thinking that they could have worded the 25 psi statement a little bit better.
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Old 02-07-2017, 03:44 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Thanks! Now I know the reason why the OEM shocks have a sleeve around the shaft portion of the shock. Likely to protect against that same potential debris on the shaft tear up.
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Old 02-07-2017, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
I talked to Joe at Teraflex today about the tire pressure question, his answer was very informative and I hope I can pass the information on so that it makes sense.

The 25 psi recommendation is simply there to let you know what tire pressure these shocks had been tuned at. They aren't recommending that your run 25 psi ONLY, on the road or off road. It is simply a Baseline so you have a number to compare to, when the shocks were tuned by the manufacturer.

Talking to Joe, the idea of mentioning the tire pressure was debated by more than a couple people. It sounds like they realized there would be some confusion with this mention, in my opinion I'm thinking that they could have worded the 25 psi statement a little bit better.
TF has gotten much better with their customer service and answering the phones. It's interesting that they'd put that number out, it should be tucked away in the instructions somewhere. Maybe it's just me but I'd think the weight of the vehicle would be a little more crucial than the tire pressure if they're going to set a ride quality baseline.

They've differentiated 2dr and 4dr so why wouldn't they put in a weight category vs the recommended tire pressure? It seems a little odd to me but then again we rate shock length by "generic lift" instead of collapsed/ extended length as it should be.
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Old 02-07-2017, 05:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Rednroll View Post
Thanks! Now I know the reason why the OEM shocks have a sleeve around the shaft portion of the shock. Likely to protect against that same potential debris on the shaft tear up.
Bingo! Nobody likes a leaky shaft!


Originally Posted by karls10jk View Post
TF has gotten much better with their customer service and answering the phones. It's interesting that they'd put that number out, it should be tucked away in the instructions somewhere. Maybe it's just me but I'd think the weight of the vehicle would be a little more crucial than the tire pressure if they're going to set a ride quality baseline.

They've differentiated 2dr and 4dr so why wouldn't they put in a weight category vs the recommended tire pressure? It seems a little odd to me but then again we rate shock length by "generic lift" instead of collapsed/ extended length as it should be.
In all fairness, the tire pressure mention is under 'Special Notes' on the box and it says that the Falcon shocks have been tuned and optimized with tires at 25 PSI. They're just trying to give you helpful information so you know where they set the performance standards. I think they could have done without the tire pressure mention, but I think it was in an effort to give their customers all the info, even though it may be a little confusing.
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